Neubrandenburg

Neubrandenburg is situated in an idyllic landscape directly by a lake, the Tollensesee. The third largest city in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is the economic and cultural centre of the Mecklenburg Lake District region. The town centre’s historical layout, its medieval fortifications with integrated watch houses (the magnificent “Wiekhäuser”) and Gothic town gates give Neubrandenburg its special charm […]

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Lüneburg convents

The six Lüneburg convents still bear witness to the once rich monastic landscape in the Principality of Lüneburg. The oldest foundation is Walsrode (before 986), then followed Ebstorf (around 1160), Lüne (1172), Wienhausen (around 1230), Medingen (1241) and Isenhagen (1243). Ebstorf, Lüne and Walsrode followed the Regula Benedicti (Rule of Benedict). Medingen, Wienhausen and Isenhagen […]

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Chorin

Known far beyond the borders of Brandenburg, Chorin’s early Gothic Cistercian monastery, built from 1272 onwards, was the most ambitious building project in Brandenburg at that time. It was here that the High Gothic architectural system that had been developed in France was implemented completely in brick for the first time.

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Eberswalde

The town of Eberswalde and the municipality of Chorin are surrounded by a landscape of forests and lakes. The town is one of the Brandenburg foundations of the Ascanian dynasty, who provided the margraves of Brandenburg until 1319. The Cistercian monastery of Chorin, eight kilometres away, is also an Ascanian foundation and served both as […]

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Flensburg

This small and idyllic port metropolis in the north of Schleswig-Holstein certainly lives up to its reputation. You can sense Fensburg’s Scandinavian flair everywhere you go, throughout the cosy alleys of the old town, in the historic merchants’ yards, and along the harbour. This truly is a town of two cultures. The history of Flensburg […]

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Frankfurt (Oder)

For more than 760 years now, St. Mary’s Church has dominated the silhouette of Frankfurt (Oder). The hall church is some 80 metres long and has a 45-metre wide transept, making it one of the largest religious buildings in North German Brick Gothic style. Other Brick Gothic buildings also bear witness to the great past […]

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Greifswald

The university and Hanseatic city of Greifswald is a city with maritime charm close to the Bay of Greifswald (Greifswalder Bodden), between the islands of Rügen and Usedom. Alongside the Hanseatic League, the founding of the university in 1456 contributed significantly to its development and still does today. Greifswald gained worldwide fame through the paintings […]

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Güstrow

Güstrow, formerly a ducal residence, takes its honorific name from expressionist sculptor Ernst Barlach. The town is famous for its magnificent buildings spanning six centuries, its artists and the largest collection of nativity scenes in Northern Germany. Güstrow Palace is particularly striking: one of the most beautiful Renaissance buildings in Northern Europe, it dominates the […]

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Jüterbog

Jüterbog is a historic town in the Fläming region, about 60 km south of Berlin. It was once a major scene of the Reformation, as it was here that Dominican friar Johann Tetzel preached and sold indulgences, thereby enraging Luther in Wittenberg, not far away. Jüterbog also has an important past as a medieval metropolis […]

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Lüneburg

Its brick gables and its charm of a bustling university town give the thousand-year-old Lüneburg an exciting flair. Narrow cobblestone streets and an abundance of small shops and restaurants invite you to explore and discover the town. The harbour is another tempting attraction with its centuries-old houses towering over the river, its Old Crane and […]

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