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The European Route of Brick Gothic was awarded a gold medal for "outstanding achievements in the preservation of historic monuments in Europe" at the denkmal2010 fair in Leipzig. 
Goldmedaille
 

Germany

 

Hanseatic city of Rostock

 
 
 

Town Hall

 
 
Town Hall
Contact:
Phone:+49 (0)381 381 14 16
www.rostock.de
 
the building:
The city hall was constructed in the late 13th century as a free-standing, double-gabled house. The cellar and the ground floor were used as a market hall with a multitude of booths, and the upper floor accommodated a banqueting hall and the council chamber. Where the building was facing the town market, a two-storey vaulted arcade was constructed as an annex. The loggia on top of this annex served as a platform for public speeches. The face masonry wall above the arcade originally had only three towers. When the arcade and the face masonry wall were extended by the addition of the New House in 1484, four additional towers were built. In the early 18th century, the city hall was subjected to a major stylistic modification to suit the Baroque tastes of the period. The Gothic arcade was replaced by the porch which is still standing today. At the same time, the growing complexity of the administration required more office space, and the large halls were sub-divided into smaller rooms. A Neo-Gothic redecoration was carried out around 1900. In 2002, the restoration works at the city hall were finally completed. Fittings, panels and other later additions which only served to spoil the overall artistic effect were removed in order to emphasize the essentially Gothic structure of the building while also preserving the contributions from the subsequent periods and complementing the design with modern elements.
 
 
 

Town Library

 
 
Town Library
Contact:
Kröpeliner Straße 82
 
the building:
The building which was constructed in the late 15th century provides one of the truly outstanding and artistically most accomplished examples for medieval residences in Rostock. The gable is structured by multi-storey blind elements, and the corbie gable has battlements and five bipartite blind openings. The brickwork of the façade is characterised by alternating courses and richly decorated with relief ornaments like medallions depicting biblical scenes and a decorative frieze of shaped bricks (lions and rosettes). The building has accommodated the town’s main library since 1961.
 
 
 

Convent of the Holy Cross and University Church

 
 
Convent of the Holy Cross and University Church
Contact:
Klosterhof, 18055 Rostock
Tel. 0381 20359-0 / -10
Fax 0381 20359-13
 
opening hours:
10-18 h excepty on Modays
 
Entrance fees:
3 Euro, 1 Euro, Fam 4 Euro
 
the building:
The Monastery of the Holy Cross was founded around 1270 as a convent for Cistercian nuns. The building was constructed in the first half of the 14th century. Following the Reformation, the building complex was used as a home for elderly gentlewomen (from 1562 until 1920), later as a residential complex and as the home for the university’s own nursery school and creche. The generally well-preserved monastery complex between university and old city wall with its church, enclosure and convent buildings can still convey an impression of the original seclusion and independence of the convent. The University Church (Church of the Holy Cross) is a three aisle stepped hall built in the first half of the 14th century in the architectural idiom of the mendicant orders which integrates choir and nave under a single roof. The rich medieval decoration has been largely preserved (with the high altar from the middle of the 15th century, the sacristy from the late 14th century and the triumphal cross). The church is used by the university. Since 1980, the convent buildings have accommodated the Museum for Cultural History. An exhibition about the convent’s history displays some of the monastery’s art treasures. The collections of the museum are presented in permanent displays and a series of constantly changing exhibitions.
 
 
 

St. Mary’s Church

 
 
St. Mary’s Church
Contact:
Am Ziegenmarkt 4
18055 Rostock
Tel.: 0381 492 33 96 u. 0381 45 33 25
Fax: 0381 - 4 97 38 51
www.marienkirche-rostock.de

opening hours:
10-16h , Sun 11.15-12h

Entrance fees:
free

 
the building:
The main parish church of the town, built in different construction stages since the 13th century, can compete in size and sheer impressiveness with the large parish churches of Lübeck and Wismar.
St. Mary’s Church is a huge brick basilica with a transept and side aisles. The central nave is considerably higher than the side aisles which have chapels attached to them on the their Northern and Southern sides. The ambulatory choir is ringed by a gallery of side chapels. The conspicuously lively colour of the exterior is produced by alternating courses of yellow and green glazed bricks. The Western front of the building is dominated by a monumental twin tower complex which was integrated into a single structure. The rich interior decoration includes an astronomical clock with a procession of the Apostles (daily at 12:00 noon), completed in 1472, the bronze baptismal font made by Rostock artisans in 1290 and a late Gothic triptych, the so-called Rochus altar. The main altar from 1721, the pulpit from 1574 and two galleries from the 18th century in the Western part of the church also deserve (and reward) closer attention.
 
 
 

Cow Gate with Lagebusch Tower

 
 
Cow Gate with Lagebusch Tower
opening hours:
only open for events

Entrance fees:
varies
 
the building:
First mentioned in the records in 1262, it is the oldest surviving city gate. Originally giving access to the city from the south, it was later used only for cattle, and later served as a dwelling. In the 1980s it was turned into a literature house. A squat, three storey brick building, it has a square ground plan. Above the ogival archway on the city side there are blind openings, and on the outer face an indented frieze, twin recesses, and embrasures. Adjoining the Cow Gate are the wall and fortified tower dating from 1577.
 
 
 

St. Nicolas’ Church

 
 
St. Nicolas´ Church
opening hours:
open only for events
 
Entrance fees:
differs
 
the building:
With its core structure from the mid-13th century, it is the earliest surviving choirless hall church in the Baltic Sea region. In the first half of the 15th century, the elevated choir was built with archway (flying buttress) and tower. After severe war damage, it was rebuilt with apartments in the attic storey and offices in the tower. The hall is used for concerts. 
 
 
 

St. Peter’s Church

 
 
St. Peters Church
opening hours:
daily 10-17 h

Entrance fees: 
tower: 1,50 Euro
 
the building:
The parish church of the oldest settlement on the Old Market. A preceding building was mentioned in 1252. The present structure was erected in the 14th century as a three aisle basilica with four bays. The tower to the west is as wide as the central aisle and has a high, octagonal pointed spire, which serves as a seamark. The 117m-high tower was reconstructed in 1994 after destruction during the war in the form of the 1578 spire. Colourful choir windows date from 1962.
 
 
 

St. Catherine’s Abbey

 
 
St. Catherine’s Abbey
Opening hour:
daily 7-20 h

Entrance fees:
free
 
the building:
It was founded in 1243 as a daughter foundation of the Lübeck Franciscans. The church is mentioned in 1259, and the abbey buildings were extended several times in the 14th and 15th centuries. The city fire of 1677 caused severe damage. The nave was not rebuilt (only the west portal survives), and the choir was converted into a church. The monastic buildings were reconstructed and used for various social purposes (orphanage, almshouse, prison, later school). In 1825, after floors had been built in and the façade redesigned, the choir was turned into an old-age home. Between 1998 and 2001 it was restored and extended by the addition of new buildings for university use.
 
 
 

Kerkohfhaus

 
 
Kerkohfhaus
Opening hour:
Mon- Fri 7-18 h
 
Entrance fees:
free
 
the building:
The late-Gothic, two-storey gabled house was renovated in the mid-16th century for mayor Kerkhof, and decorated with coloured terracotta elements. The gable is constructed of alternating glazed and unglazed bricks. The portal with depressed round arch has a richly profiled splay. The upper storey has coupled windows with cable-moulding mullions surmounted by medallions of warriors’ heads. The seven-axis crow-stepped gable contains terracotta ornaments with early Renaissance elements. The interior was completely refurbished in 1907.
 
 
 

House Tree House

 
 
House Tree House
Contact:
Wokrenter Straße 40

Opening hour: 
after appointment
Phone: +49 0381/45 82 142
 
Guided:
after appointment
 
the building:
A combined warehouse and dwelling from the late 15th century. Three storey crow-stepped gable with five blind ogee arches starting from the upper storey and hatches over three storeys. A large interior hall with the so-called House Tree has been preserved, a mighty oaken support bearing the ground floor ceiling.
 
 
 

Krahnstöver

 
 
Opening hour:
11-22 h
 
Entrance fees:
free
 
the building:
First mentioned in the records in 1376, the combined warehouse and dwelling was given its present form in the second half of the 15th century. The mighty seven-axis corbie gable is surmounted by battlements, the central blind openings unite the upper storey windows of the residential apartments and the rows of hatches over four storeys. The low ground floor with its portal and bay windows was restored in about 1930. The adjoining narrow retirement house built of whitewashed brick is late Gothic. Inside there is a large hall with Baroque fittings and furnishings. Seat of the former liqueur manufacturer Kranstöver, now used as a restaurant.
 
 
 

St. Michael’s Church

 
 
St. Michaels Church
Contact:
Altbettelmönchstraße
 
Opening hour:
Monastery: Mon- Fri 10-16h
Church: only for church service
 
Entrance fees:
free
 
the building:
St. Michael’s Church and the Wool Store. Originally the lay brothers’ house and church of the Brothers of the Life in Community, who in 1476 ran the first printing works in Rostock. With its aspect of a single-nave friars’ church, the long brick building combines in an unusual manner the religious and profane premises of the monastic community. After secularisation, the buildings were put to a variety of uses, e.g., warehouse (wool store) and transformer station. After having been damaged in the war, the eastern part of the church was restored in 1956, the western part being restored and converted as a university library in 1999. The library stocks include books originally printed there.
 
 
 

Kröpelin Gate

 
 
Kröpelin Gate
Opening hour:
10-18h except on Mondays
 
Entrance fees:
free
 
the building:
At the end of the Kröpeliner Straße stands the Kröpelin Gate, a western, 54-metre-high gate on the important trade route from Lübeck and Wismar. The two square lower storeys, topped by a double indented frieze, date from the end of the 13th century. The upper storeys from the 14th century are constructed of lighter brick. The tower is subdivided in the middle by a tracery frieze, and the city face is enlivened by large-scale tracery openings. In the 1960s it was converted into a museum.